Erics paper on resin casting at the santa Fe Symposium

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nzfinescale
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Re: Erics paper on resin casting at the santa Fe Symposium

Postby nzfinescale » Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:29 pm

Now that is a useful and interesting piece!
Storen
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Re: Erics paper on resin casting at the santa Fe Symposium

Postby Storen » Sat Jun 02, 2018 2:04 pm

Reading that document made me understand why people pay the ridiculous prices of Solidscape :D
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M-Williams
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Re: Erics paper on resin casting at the santa Fe Symposium

Postby M-Williams » Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:05 pm

A study lacking a clear conclusion. we just have to stick with what we have, and fine tune it better.
Christian K.
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Re: Erics paper on resin casting at the santa Fe Symposium

Postby Christian K. » Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:57 pm

I think its nice to know, that the boiling is "the" key. when we microwave our models they also boil.
maybe i'll try just boiling without the microwave treatment.


We have really good casting, the came out flaweless. only the lettering causes problems. so i will focus to solve this thing.
We will make some tests in June - i will post some picture after that.
Also the ratio promles was clear to us. with 36/100 the resuls were not better. now we cast nearly 1 year with plasticast with 38/100 ratio.

Also what is interesting is the terst with the ages pieces.
I will print ring with a lot of lettering and store it 2 or 3 weeks.


good week to all
rkundla
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Re: Erics paper on resin casting at the santa Fe Symposium

Postby rkundla » Mon Jun 04, 2018 4:37 pm

Not all castable resins are receptive to boiling techniques unfortunately. Resins that use wax or a wax replacement (like Waxcast) could be damaged in boiling liquid. You may still need to UV cure the exterior to toughen it against the hot liquid.

Unlike wax which has very specific properties, the unique chemistry for each castable resin makes the standardization of curing and burnout of resins very difficult. Ultimately, if you find a way that works for you, stick with it and don't listen to anyone else for advice. ;-)
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mongerdesigns
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Re: Erics paper on resin casting at the santa Fe Symposium

Postby mongerdesigns » Mon Jun 04, 2018 4:43 pm

Yes. What Ron said! Ignore those other types of self-promoting papers and stick to what works best for you.
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Christian K.
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Re: Erics paper on resin casting at the santa Fe Symposium

Postby Christian K. » Mon Jun 04, 2018 5:22 pm

No for sure - we use the emerald - all i said was about that, without mentioning it. :D

Thank you @rkundla !!!
What i can say about the Emrald is that a lot of jewellers had problems with our burnout.
99% of the problem was because of the bad airflow.
good friend of mine is chemist - airflow is a very important thing.
just to say ignore these papers would be a big mistake - mainly for those who are just getting started.

There are many things mentioned in the paper, that I can only agree!

We cast everyday, and have now a thick book of detailed notes.
For us the only thing that don't work is detailed letterings.
rsaldivar
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Re: Erics paper on resin casting at the santa Fe Symposium

Postby rsaldivar » Mon Jun 04, 2018 10:20 pm

I personally don't see him as self promoting , I think he is trying to crack this resin thing and sharing

knowledge is not bad ,
I would say stick to what works for you and try having a open mind to improving what you're trying too , test for yourself and see for yourself , I think I can benefit from this paper to use for my technique , lots of time I don't have to spend that someone else did , remember , how we use the green now is a result of trial and error , I still believe in the blue and use it because of the detail and eas of grow and am trying to perfect the technique of casting it as well as the green , it never hurts to try something new and see if it works better than what I'm doing

at least that's my opinion
MarkPhilip
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Re: Erics paper on resin casting at the santa Fe Symposium

Postby MarkPhilip » Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:45 pm

"The stain test demonstrated that the rate of cure is utterly inconsequential. Fully cured parts could produce a casting defect for a particular geometry while aged, uncured parts did not."

"Weak investment and uncured resin were not to blame for casting defects."

"It should also be noted that UV treatments of any intensity or duration did not affect the subsurface. The dyes and pigments in a resin exponentially limit the penetration of light waves. This is why they are appropriately named UV blockers.

"UV treatments should be kept to a minimum with resin parts. Longer or higher intensity exposures do not affect the subsurface of a part."

"The 10-minute boiling treatment sufficiently prepares most parts for casting. " (resin in hot water for 10 mins)

"A common problem when heating resin parts is cracking, especially in thick sections. This can be prevented by controlling the rate of heating and minimizing the exposure to UV treatments."

"The boiling treatment was also shown to reduce cracking significantly during subsequent annealing and heat-curing treatments. Water transfers heat to the part much more efficiently and uniformly than air. It also arrests the temperature and, therefore, the viscosity of the part, allowing higher levels of stress to exit the part slowly and safely."

"Isopropyl alcohol and especially acetone are also known to cause cracking and crazing. The solvents penetrate the part during cleaning and weaken the polymer. This is especially true when heat is added. The increased kinetic energy accelerates the damage. A three-minute cleaning is recommended using a sealable plastic bag, fresh isopropyl alcohol, and an ultrasonic. Removing the excess air from the bag allows a dozen parts to be cleaned with less than 100 mL of solvent. The parts should be rinsed in water and allowed to dry before exposure to heat."

interesting read

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